Well you'd almost have be hiding under a rock to not know that Mornington pier has been producing a bucket load of squid lately. While you can expect a bag of small sized squid from the pier on most nights, these squid are in plague numbers at the moment and your bag of 10 can be achieved in 10 casts! Make no mistake though - as they CAN be super aggressive, like every form of fishing there is certain technique and gear that will see you bag out while some go empty-handed.


Jig size is critical for success at Mornington pier at the moment. While you can catch small squid on a size 2.5 or even 3.0 at the moment, for every 1 that you catch on bigger jigs someone else will catch 5. These squid are small and they are feeding on small prey, so size 1.8 jigs have been the absolute best. These size 1.8 Daiwa Emeraldas Nudes have been super effective and have multiple standout reasons why they are working - come in and check them out, before they run out.

Many anglers have been setting their jigs up 'paternoster' style as well - there is no need for this. 1; you rarely have to cast more than 20m from the pier even in windy conditions and 2; You don't want a sinker thumping the bottom as you work the jigs back - it can put the squid off. These quality jigs are designed from the ground up to fished without a paternoster setup, and you WILL catch more squid using them this way when compared to the rest of the crowd!


Customers Harry and Jim had a quick session on the pier during the week to catch some squid. Size 1.8 Yamashita Naory jigs in red head were the best, especially when sunk to the bottom and subtlety darted back.


Staff member Don has been at the pier multiple times this week and has managed to bag on the squid, with 8 squid from 8 casts just the other day! Don has found small jigs worked back quite fast and mid way through the water column has been a good way to trick this small squid into grabbing hold. Colour choice has not mattered, with some certain colours working for a small period and then others taking over, especially as the light or conditions change. Don also found that the pier was crazy busy, but amongst the crowds only few were catching as most were too busy copying the 'sinker brigade' and not focusing on keeping their jigs in the right area, and experimenting with different colour options and shades to catch their bag.

 

 

 

It seems that some of the kingfish 'crowd' has died off somewhat with the weather over recent weeks, but make no mistake there are still heaps of kingies about. There are no real 'hot spots' but in saying that a little bit of local insight on gear and rigging can pay off. The Rip has been producing fish, along with most of the usual headlands and offshore reefs, and the average size of the fish around is really at present - with plenty of 7 - 11kg fish and a good spread of bigger 'hoodlums' up to 15 or so kg.


Friend of the shop and Victorian EJ Todds representative Mitch fished out from Welshpool just recent in a 'product testing' day trialing some new jig designs and it is fair to say that the jigs did the job. Multiple smokings and fish upward of 10kg along with flat seas made for an awesome session. One of the standouts of the day were 'slow fall' style jigs - and these normally get overlooked by kingfish anglers. The slow fall advantage really comes in to it's own when the fish are a bit unsure or not super aggressive. Slow fall style jigs 'flutter' their way to the bottom like an injured baitfish and spend more time in the strike zone to tempt otherwise uninterested fish. If you are unsure about this style of jig or interested in trying them on the local fish then talk to the guys in store, as there are some good options that are worth a look.

Customer Marty also had another good session on the local kingies, with fish to 8kg out from Phillip Island. Marty fished out around the eastern entrance and got these fish on a mixture of baits and lures, with slow fall jigs working well. The ever faithful squid and yakka baits also got a few fish too.


There have also been some serious salmon moving about amongst the kingfish school as well. Some of the fish have been as large as 4kg, which will have you calling them for a kingfish. The average sized fish have been around a kilo, and have been smashing smaller live baits along with stickbaits and plastics. Customer Frank got into these nice fish that were moving around the rip recently on small metal lures and stickbaits.

 

 


The bream fishing has been good around Melbourne over the last week as the water temperature has cooled off slightly with the weather we've had. While many anglers go about their bream fishing on a day to day basis, now is almost the perfect time to be out chasing them. The fish are still super active as there is an abundance of food items, but the water in the shallows isn't too hot making them lethargic.

Customer Aaron and partner Borom caught and released some bream just recently. They used a mixture of offerings with small freshwater yabbies on 'C10U' hooks working well, along with lightly weighted Zman grubs.


Customer Jordan fished with mates in the Patto over the weekend where they landed some nice bream. The guys caught 5 nice fish with most between 32 - 40cm. A finesse rig with ultra light running sinker and light leader brought the fish undone, with the humble scrubworm being the bait of choice.


Customer Ryan has also been catching some nice bream around the metro rivers. Ryan has been sticking with a simple approach, fishing landbased around the Yarra and Maribyrnong rivers and using only lures. Small single tail grubs have been the most effective when fished on jigheads up to 1/12th in weight. Natural coloured plastics smeared in bloodworm scent have been getting eaten by most fish especially when fished around pontoons, bridges and litter traps that line the metro rivers.

 


Port Phillip has really been providing a variety of fish for anglers recently. Pretty much every fish that one would want to catch in the bay can be caught right now. From pinkies, snapper, gars, salmon, kingfish, flathead and whiting the species choices are pretty widespread, it's just a matter of picking a fish and targeting it.

James from Unreel Fishing Charters reports of insane pinkie snapper action, with plenty of fish up to 2kg around the inshore reefs. During low light conditions these fish are going nuts, with multiple rods getting smashed on every bait that hits the water. The plastic fishing for these fish has been very good too, with all of the same areas like Black rock, Williamstown and Mornington all producing heaps of fish if you're fishing plastics.


Soft plastics in the 2 - 4'' size range have been the best of the pinkies, with 'stretchier' and tougher style plastics proving to be excellent value for money, with more than a dozen fish landed on a single plastic and no signs of damage. 'Bungee baits', Zman's and Squidgy 'Biotough' are all excellent options, just pick a natural and a bright colour to suit most conditions.


While fishing baits or scented plastics around the inshore reefs, fish like red mullet can be a common bycatch. Customers Ryan and Nick have been a heap amongst the pinkies, flathead and salmon along the eastern seaboard of the bay. Normally if you are over shallower heavy reef you will start catching the red mullet, and as you push deeper to where the reef steps down you will find less of these and more pinkie snapper.


There have also been some serious salmon in the bay for a while, with big schools spotted anywhere from Black Rock through to The Rip. Most of the fish have been around 1kg in size which makes them great fun on light spinning gear, or not bad on the table if they are looked after. Small metal lures up to 15g have been working well, along with tiny, whitebait imitation soft plastics. If you manage to get one of these lures to the bottom without a salmon intercepting it, there have been sand flathead to around 40cm keen on eating it.


Further north in the bay, there have been some decent bream mixed in with the schools of pinkies. While the pinkies have been much faster to get to the baits, the numbers of open water bream have been a surprise to a few anglers. The shallow sandflats around the top end of the bay have seen bream feeding around low light conditions where they have been taking baits and lures meant for flathead. This 43cm fish was caught by customer Michael, on a 4'' soft plastic aimed at a shallow water flathead at first light.

 


The estuaries out along the east Gippsland coastline are fishing well at present. The holiday crowds have quietened off and water traffic is back to a minimum and the fish are eating. The Gippsland lakes themselves have been quiet however, with some rumoured blue-green algae present. Lake Tyers has been producing fish for anglers keen enough to be on the water early and late, and move about to find the fish. Customer Shane was down at Tyers just recently where he landed this ripper flathead that measured 92cm. The monster flattie took a 5'' prawn imitation, which needless to say Shane has stocked up on again.


The bream have been actively feeding around the margins of the lakes and creeks in the area, with shallow diving minnows and surface presentations getting the most consistent results. A common theme recently has been the use of brightly coloured lures to 'shock' the bream in to giving a 'reaction' bite. Where natural or ghost colour patterns may go unnoticed the brighter contrasting colours key in to the fishes inquisitive nature and the only way for them to test is by using their mouth!


Customer Ryan with some average Gippsland bream caught using small brightly coloured surface and subsurface lures, with overcast and slightly choppy conditions favoured as being the most productive.

 


The top end of Westernport has been getting fished a bit over the last week by anglers in search of whiting, and the whiting fishing has been a bit sporadic in the shallows - but there have been some nice flathead caught as bycatch. Most of the flathead caught around the whiting grounds tend to be sand flathead, but sometimes you will find a patch of tasty rock flathead as well. Staff member Chris fished with mate Jay out near Yaringa where they did catch both King George whiting and rock flathead. The rock flathead were good size and took baits intended for the whiting over thick weed beds in 4m of water. The same ground also produced school sized whiting.


Just over at Warneet, customer Sam caught a nice bag of whiting earlier in the week. Sam fished in 7m of water and found the start of the incoming tide the most productive time. Fish to 44cm took a mixture of baits including pipi, squid and cuttlefish. The 6 - 12m area seems to have been the more productive depth for the whiting at the moment, with most anglers concentrating in this zone. 

 


The hot trout fishing has continued this week with Eildon pondage still producing plenty of fish for dedicated anglers. The coarse-method bait fishing using a fine grit berley and dough style baits has accounted for most of the catch at the moment, with the odd fish caught on a lure in between bait hook ups. Customer Zoran has again been catching good numbers of trout using these techniques, and says that there is no 'hot spot' - rather that a correct berley mixture and persistence will create your own 'hot spot'.

Customer Jenice fished the pondage a few weeks ago and her father came in store to stock up and try his luck. After the correct berley and bait tactics were discussed he went back and caught trout like this lovely brown using the same methods.


A bit closer to home, customer Jim sent us a report from Devilbend Reservoir where he caught this thumping brown trout recently. Jim fishes the area fairly regularly and after seeing his dad Mark's fish in last week's report it prompted him to send this report in. Jim does a bit of lure fishing at Devilbend and this fish was caught on the humble 'tassie devil' in you guessed it...pink!

 


While most anglers would not assume that Autumn is 'snapper time' - from late February through to April the snapper fishing in Port Phillip bay can be very good. The best part about this 'late' season fishing is that normally there is not as much boat traffic, and the average size of the fish can be good. The area to be looking is 18 - 20m of water anywhere from around Mt Eliza through to the Mt Martha spoil grounds. First light seems to coincide with a consistent bite, and pilchard and squid the top baits.


James from Unreel Fishing Charters has been doing some hard work in looking around for these fish lately, and he has been putting customers on to some lovely fish. James said that the snapper fishing at the moment may be better than what it was back in November. The fish have averaged around 2 - 4kg and have been favouring pilchard at the moment.

 

Whiting reports from Westernport this week have been a bit patchy, with quite a few anglers talking of hard fishing and sparse action. Many anglers who have been going out and 'staying put' in known areas have been struggling a bit, but the guys constantly moving about and trying different things are getting some nice fish. Fishing deep has been productive for anglers recently, with less fish coming aboard but much better quality in the fish that are. Just make sure you have suitable 'deep water' whiting rods, as many standard 'bank' whiting rods will be overloaded with the extra weight needed in the deeper water.

Customer Steve fished out from Warneet earlier this week and while the reports were grim, Steve and his mate managed 10 whiting between them - with only 2 fish measuring under 40cm. The boys worked hard and found the better fish a bit deeper in the 10m area, with the run out tide providing the action, and baits of pipi and mussel fishing the best for them.


Staff member Don fished around the top end as well over the weekend where him and mate Sam caught 17 fish. Fishing in around 5m of water, the bite started going as the run out tide started gaining momentum and the fish wouldn't look past a small pipi fished on a size 6 'worm. hook.

 


There has been some good fishing for garfish this week, with most of the shallow inshore areas holding good numbers of fish. Many of the shallow sandy bays from the top end around St Kilda all the way down to Portsea have been producing fish, with fish varying from pencil sized right the way through to over 40cm. Most of the piers have been producing these tasty fish but the more popular areas have been Seaford, Frankston and Rye. Generally these piers over sandier ground seem to fish better, especially once you have gotten them berleyed up. The daylight hours have seen the gars biting best, but they can still be caught after dark if you have them berleyed up and hanging around as the sun goes down.


Customer Tas has been fishing in close out the front of Mordialloc to land some nice fish. Silverfish has been the best bait for him with some of the bigger gars eating full silverfish on size 10 hooks.